Letters

Mary Ellen Castagno of Wayland: ‘Yes’ on 1

Wayland Town Crier: I am sure by now that many of you have seen the three advertisements sponsored by the Massachusetts chapter of the American Nurses Association (ANA) with backing from the Massachusetts Health and Hospital Association supporting a “no” vote. The advertisement is deceptive and contains a lot of misinformation and scare tactics to confuse the public. Right out of the gate, the public should be aware that the nurses in the ANA advertisements are administrators dressed in scrubs and not bedside nurses. With that said, how would they know what’s best for the patient?

Letter to the editor: RN supports Question 1

Gardner News: I am a registered nurse working on the medical surgical unit at Heywood Hospital. I hope to shed some light on Question 1 and why actual bedside nurses are for it. I do not see this as a political issue but rather a human issue, a patient right issue and a patient safety issue. Right now there is no maximum number of patients hospitals can assign a nurse. We can have as many as they want to assign us. The hospital uses a number grid that does not look at how sick or critical a patient is (acuity), they just see you, the patient, as a number.

Nurse advocates for Patient Safety Act support

Sentinel & Enterprise: I support the Patient Safety Act, a November 2018 ballot measure establishing safe maximum limits on the number of patients assigned to a nurse at one time. As a registered nurse for 27 years at the bedside, currently at HealthAlliance in Leominster for the past 11 years, I have had experience trying to care for too many patients at one time. It was exhausting, dangerous, and goes against our best science as well as common sense.

Thompson: Vote yes in November to ensure safe nurse/patient limits

Leominster Champion: I’m writing to reach my neighbors regarding the Patient Safety Act, as both a concerned registered nurse and a proud Leominster resident. The proposed ballot initiative would place safe limits on the amount of patients assigned to a nurse at one time.

Listen to nurses not executives

The Recorder: In California, where there is a law limiting the number of patients assigned to nurses, no hospitals have closed, patient outcomes have dramatically improved, there are no increased bottlenecks and the retention rate of nurses is second to none.

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